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ENC1102_LibraryInstruction

Avoiding Plagiarism

 

 

plagiarism.jpg

Chronicle of Higher Education. (2010). "Responding to Plagiarism", Retrieved from: http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/responding-to-plagiarism/24769

 

Avoiding Plagiarism

 

puzzle_overview.JPGOverview:

By now, you probably have heard about plagiarism and you know that it's something you should avoid. But few students really understand what constitutes an act of plagiarism and even fewer understand why teachers and professors view it so disparangingly. But in fact, plagiarism is intellectual theft because when you fail to acknowledge the ideas and words of others and instead pass them off as your own, you're essentially stealing someone else's work. 

In this module, you will become familiar with the definition of plagiarism and learn how you can easily avoid it. In addition, you'll learn some of the possible consequences for students who engage in academic dishonesty at USF.

MODULE OBJECTIVES:
After completing this module you will be able to:

  • Identify the definition of plagiarism
  • Determine when it is necessary to cite a source (common knowledge vs. original thoughts)
  • Differentiate between citing a direct quote versus ideas
  • Identify one possible academic consequence for those that plagiarize at USF

jigsaw-puzzle-piece.jpgACTIVITIES:

  1. View the video below (courtesy of Brock University Library) on the definition of plagiarism:
  2. View the two short tutorials (each only one and a half minutes long) below about when and why you need
    to cite your sources to avoid plagiarism:
    • View the video tutorial Plagiarism: You Can't Just Change a Few Words 

      Link
    •  View the tutorial Avoiding Plagiarism: What Do I Need to Cite?

      Link
  3.  Review USF Policies on Plagiarism
    1. Review the USF policy covering Academic Integrity of Students, paying special attention to the sections addressing plagiarism (pg. 4, item 2) and the Severity of Conduct Determinations & Academic Sanctions (starting on pg. 8). Be prepared to answer the following questions:
      1. How many levels are provided for undergraduate academic integrity violations?
      2. For undergraduate students, what is the penalty for the first "FF" grade recorded in a student's academic record?

Module Quiz

Complete the module quiz located inside your Canvas course. This quiz has six questions. You wil have fifteen minutes to complete this quiz, but you may take it twice (highest score retained).