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Coastal Area Climate Change Education (CACCE): Consequences

The CACCE Partnership is one of fifteen projects funded in 2010 by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of their Climate Change Education Partnership (CCEP) program.

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Resources | Consequences

Following the classification schema employed by the CAMEL Project website, this list includes information regarding observed deviations from past climate (e.g. melting glaciers, rising sea level, etc.) which impact the environment and humans.

 

Adapting to Climate Change: Facing the Consequences

Description: Global action is not going to stop climate change. The world needs to look harder at how to live with it.; AuthorThis article reports on high-level climate talks held at the COP16/CMP6, the 16th edition of Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP).

Keywords: Consequences; Humans; Human Nature; Resilience

Access: Subscription Required

Audience: Grades 10-12, Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students, Lifelong Learners

Citation: The Economist. 2010"Adapting to Climate Change: Facing the Consequences." The Economist, November 25. Accessed July 21, 2014. http://www.economist.com/node/17572735.



America, the Ocean, and Climate Change: New Research Insights for Conservation, Awareness, and Action
http://theoceanproject.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/America_the_Ocean_and_Climate_Change_KeyFindings_1Jun09final.pdf

Description: A recent major public opinion survey sponsored by The Ocean Project in collaboration with the Monterey Bay Aquarium and the National Aquarium in Baltimore produced a massive amount of data gathered from more than 22,000 respondents in the United States. The survey expanded considerably on The Ocean Project’s landmark research from 1999. This report – America, the Ocean, and Climate Change: New Research Insights for Conservation, Awareness, and Action – distills the survey findings and implications into a succinct, actionable compilation to help aquariums, zoos, museums, and others more effectively advance ocean conservation. ---- Authors

Keywords: Consequences; Life & Death

Access: Open Access

Audience: Grades 10-12, Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students, Lifelong Learners

Citation:



American Risk Perceptions: is Climate Change Dangerous?

Description: Public risk perceptions can fundamentally compel or constrain political, economic, and social action to address particular risks. Public support or opposition to climate policies (e.g., treaties, regulations, taxes, subsidies) will be greatly influenced by public perceptions of the risks and dangers posed by global climate change. This article describes results from a national study (2003) that examined the risk perceptions and connotative meanings of global warming in the American mind and found that Americans perceived climate change as a moderate risk that will predominantly impact geographically and temporally distant people and places. This research also identified several distinct interpretive communities, including naysayers and alarmists, with widely divergent perceptions of climate change risks.Thus, “dangerous” climate change is a concept. ---- Authors

Keywords: Consequences; Humans; Human Nature

Access: Open Access

Audience:

Citation: Risk Analysis 25.6 (2005): 1433-1442



Antarctica's Climate Secrets
http://www.andrill.org/flexhibit/index.html

Description: This informal science education project is funded by the International Polar Year program of the National Science Foundation to increase public understanding of ANDRILL, the multi-national, NSF-funded Antarctic Drilling Project.   Originally titled, Engaging Antarctica, the project now goes by the name, Antarctica's Climate Secrets.

Keywords: Consequences; Physical Earth; Water; Ice; Glaciers

Access: Open Access

Audience: Grades 10 -12, Grades 4 - 6

Citation:



Cities Lead the Way in Climate–Change Action
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/467909a

Description: Scientists should do the research to help mayors prepare for a warming world, say Cynthia Rosenzweig, William Solecki, Stephen A. Hammer and Shagun Mehrotra.

Keywords: Consequences; Humans; Human Nature; Resilience

Access: Subscription Required

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Citation: Nature 467 (2010): 909–911



Climate Resilient Cities
http://siteresources.worldbank.org/EASTASIAPACIFICEXT/Resources/climatecities_fullreport.pdf

Description: This Primer is the outcome of a 'Green Cities' Technical Assistance project led by the World Bank’s East Asia and the Pacific Region Sustainable Development Department (EASSD), with collaboration and co-funding from the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR) and the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (UN/ ISDR). The principal authors of the Primer are Federica Ranghieri, Environmental Specialist at the World Bank; Ravi Sinha, Disaster Risk Specialist with the Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai; and Earl Kessler, Urban Management Consultant. The document also reflects technical inputs and management from the World Bank project team, which included Fatima Shah, Zoe Elena Trohanis, and Neeraj Prasad (Team Leader). Sandra Walston, Bernadine D’Souza, Inneke Herawati, Pui Phetmanee, and Phun Dechnarong assisted with contracting and logistics. James Cantrell supported cover design, Nick Bowden provided support to photo selection, Victoria Taylor assisted with maps, and Sheldon Lippman and Anne Harrison provided editing support. Ultradesigns, a Maryland-based graphics and design firm, developed the layout of the Primer 'Kit'. Dohatec New Media assisted with the CD programming and the Primer was printed by Focal Image Printing Group Co., Ltd. in Bangkok. Lester Dally, Noi Fitts, Elisabeth Mealey, Claudia Gabarain and Anissa Tria assisted with the dissemination of the Primer.The project was prepared under the guidance of Keshav Varma, Sector Director, Urban, Water, and Disaster Management Unit of EASSD, The World Bank, and Saroj Kumar Jha, Program Manager, GFDRR. The Primer benefited from peer review comments from Rosanna Nitti and Dan Hoornweg at the World Bank, and Jerry Velasquez and Angelika Planitz at UN/ ISDR. The team acknowledges the support received from the Government of Makati City in the Philippines, along with ISDR and CityNet, in hosting the Consultation Workshop in May 2008 to discuss and receive feedback on the Primer from cities across the Region. The team would also like to thank the United Cities and Local Governments Asia Pacific Congress 2008 (UCLG ASPAC) for co-hosting (alongside ISDR, GFDRR, and the World Bank) the global launch of the Primer in Pattaya, Thailand, on July 14, 2008, and to the speakers, facilitators, and participants that made the event a success. ---- Authors

Keywords: Consequences; Humans; Human Nature; Resilience

Access: Open Access

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Climate Resources Guide for Master Gardeners
http://www.cocorahs.org/Content.aspx?page=MasterGardener

Description: The CoCoRaHS Climate Resources for Master Gardeners Guide introduces elements of climate important to gardeners.  An overview of climate patterns and differences are shown. Links to local climate information are provided. Topics include: Climate & Gardening, Sunshine, Temperature, Humidity and Dew Point, Precipitation, Wind, Evapotranspiration, Climate Resources, Climate Change and CoCoRaHS. ---- Authors

Keywords: Consequences; Humans; Health; Food Security

Access: Open Access

Audience: Undergraduate Students, Lifelong Learners, Graduate Students, Grades 10 -12, Faculty

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Coastal Zones and Sea Level Rise
http://epa.gov/climatechange/effects/coastal/index.html

Description: Coastal zones are particularly vulnerable to climate variability and change. Key concerns include sea level rise, land loss, changes in maritime storms and flooding, responses to sea level rise and implications for water resources.

Keywords: Consequences; Physical Earth; Water; Oceans; Sea Level

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Audience: Grades 10 -12, Graduate Students, Lifelong Learners

Citation:



Comprehensive Southwest Florida/Charlotte Harbor Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment
http://www.chnep.org/projects/climate/climatechangevulnerabilityassessment.pdf

Description: The Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program is a partnership of citizens, elected officials, resource managers and commercial and recreational resource users working to improve the water quality and ecological integrity of the greater Charlotte Harbor watershed. A cooperative decision-making process is used within the program to address diverse resource management concerns in the 4,400 square mile study area. Many of these partners also financially support the Program, which, in turn, affords the Program opportunities to fund projects such as this. The entities that have financially supported the program include the following:U.S. Environmental Protection AgencySouthwest Florida Water Management DistrictSouth Florida Water Management DistrictFlorida Department of Environmental ProtectionPeace River/Manasota Regional Water Supply AuthorityPolk, Sarasota, Manatee, Lee, Charlotte, DeSoto, and Hardee CountiesCities of Sanibel, Cape Coral, Fort Myers, Punta Gorda, North Port, Venice,Fort Myers Beach, and Winter Havenand the Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council.

Keywords: Consequences; Humans; Health; Water Security

Access: Open Access

Audience:

Citation: Technical Report 09-3, September 15, 2009



Cross-national Comparisons of Image Associations with Global Warming and Climate Change among Laypeople in the United States of America and Great Britain
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13669870600613658

Description: Climate change poses significant risks to societies worldwide, yet governmental responses differ greatly on either side of the North Atlantic. Risk perception studies have shown that citizens in the United States and Great Britain have similar risk perceptions of climate change: it is considered a distant threat, of limited personal importance. Engaging the public on this issue is thus challenging. Affect, the positive or negative evaluation of an object, idea, or mental image, has been shown to powerfully influence individual processing of information and decision-making. This paper explores the affective images underlying public risk perceptions of climate change through comparative findings from national surveys in the USA and in Great Britain. American and British respondents predominantly referred to generic manifestations and impacts of climate change or to a different environmental problem (ozone depletion). The terms “global warming” and “climate change”, and their associated images, evoked negative affective responses from most respondents. Personally relevant impacts, causes, and solutions to climate change, were rarely mentioned, indicating that climate change is psychologically distant for most individuals in both nations. The role of affective images in risk judgements and individual decision-making deserves greater study. ---- Authors

Keywords: Consequences; Humans; Human Nature; Intelligence

Access: Open Access

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Citation: Journal of Risk Research 9.3 (2006): 265-28



Cultural Cognition of Scientific Consensus
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13669877.2010.511246

Description: Why do members of the public disagree - sharply and persistently - about facts on which expert scientists largely agree? We designed a study to test a distinctive explanation: the cultural cognition of scientific consensus. The cultural cognition of risk refers to the tendency of individuals to form risk perceptions that are congenial to their values. The study presents both correlational and experimental evidence confirming that cultural cognition shapes individuals' beliefs about the existence of scientific consensus, and the process by which they form such beliefs, relating to climate change, the disposal of nuclear wastes, and the effect of permitting concealed possession of handguns. The implications of this dynamic for science communication and public policy-making are discussed. ---- Authors

Keywords: Consequences; Humans; Human Nature

Access: Subscription Required

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Citation: Journal of Risk Research 14.2 (2011): 147-174



Economic Impacts of Climate Change on Florida
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/FE/FE78700.pdf

Description: The issue of climate change has attracted the attention of Florida's policymakers. Executive Order 07-127, signed by Governor Charles Crist in 2007, calls for the reduction of state greenhouse gas emission by 80% from the 1990 level by 2050 (Florida Governor's Action Team on Energy and Climate Change 2008). In June of 2008, Governor Crist hosted a Climate Change Summit after Chief Financial Officer Alex Sink and Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Services Charles Bronson hosted a series of Conversations on Climate Change in 2007.Despite these efforts, many skeptics of climate change remain among Florida decision-makers and the general public concerning the effect of human activities on climate. Some argue that the price of reducing carbon emissions is too high compared to the uncertain benefits and the limited effects of our actions on climate (McCollum 2007).This document focuses on one piece of the policy-making puzzle related to climate change: possible economic costs for the state of Florida associated with climate change projections. ---- Authors

Keywords: Consequences

Access: Open Access

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An Investigation of Middle School Students' Alternative Conceptions of Global Warming
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0950069970190503

Description: Because global warming presents a serious potential threat to our biosphere, it is receiving considerable attention by scientists, policy makers, and educators. This article presents alternative conceptions about global warming held by a sample of 24 grade 6 to 8 students. Students completed interviews on global warming approximately two weeks after instruction from a Science-Technology-Society (STS) global warming unit. The majority of students introduced 'ozone layer' or 'ultraviolet radiation' in response to the question, 'When you think about global warming, what comes to mind?' Approximately one-half of the students held alternative conceptions that the ozone layer depletion is a major cause of global warming and that carbon dioxide destroys the ozone layer. These and other alternative conceptions evidenced by students suggest that global warming instruction should help students clarify that ozone layer depletion and global warming are different environmental problems and that the ozone 'hole' does not enhance the greenhouse effect. ---- Authors

Keywords: Consequences; Humans; Human Nature

Access: Open Access

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Citation: International Journal of Science Education 19.5 (1997): 527-551



Land-Surface Average Temperature Analysis Charts
http://berkeleyearth.org/analysis/

Description: The Berkeley Earth team has completed the analysis of the full data set, and summary charts are posted below. The Berkeley Earth team has already started to benefit from feedback from our peers, so these figures are more up-to-date than the figures in our papers submitted for peer review. In particular, the data from NASA GISS has been updated to be more directly comparable to the land-average constructed by Berkeley Earth and NOAA. ---- Authors

Keywords: Consequences; Physical Earth

Access: Open Access

Audience: Undergraduate Students, Lifelong Learners, Graduate Students, Grades 10 -12, Faculty

Citation:



NASA Global Climate Change News
http://climate.nasa.gov/news/

Description: A resource provided by NASA to include the latest information and updates on global climate change.

Keywords: Consequences; Physical Earth; Global Cycles

Access: Open Access

Audience: Undergraduate Students, Lifelong Learners, Graduate Students, Grades 4 - 6, Grades 10 -12, Faculty

Citation:



The Piloting of Two Instruments to Measure Elementary Methods Students' Understanding and Attitudes about Global Climate Change
http://www.coe.fau.edu/faculty/lambert/climatechange/NARST2010ClimateChangeEDPaper.pdf

Description: Climate change has become an important global issue, and it is critical that teachers have an understanding of the fundamental science, the natural and human-induced factors affecting climate, and the potential consequences and solutions. However, research findings indicate that the greenhouse effect and global warming, fundamental to understanding climate change, are complex phenomena that students continue to express alternative conceptions even after instruction (Mason & Santi, 1998; Rye, Rubba, & Wiesenmayer, 1997). Common trends in the findings from several studies include elementary and secondary students confusing the greenhouse effect with ozone depletion or causally attributing the former to the latter. Students commonly explain the greenhouse effect as an environmental problem rather than as a natural phenomenon. They confuse it with it’s consequences (e.g., increase in Earth’s mean temperature and sea level rise)(Koulaidis & Christidou, 1998, p. 560-561). ---- Authors

Keywords: Consequences; Humans; Society

Access: Open Access

Audience: Undergraduate Students, Lifelong Learners, Graduate Students, Faculty

Citation:



Polk County Water Atlas
http://www.polk.wateratlas.usf.edu/education/#climatechange

Description: The goal of this site is to provide a comprehensive data resource, eventually covering the State of Florida, that helps citizens and scientists alike make informed decisions concerning our vital water resources.

Keywords: Consequences; Physical Earth; Global Cycles; Water

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Audience: All levels

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The Polls-Trends: Twenty Years of Public Opinion about Global Warming
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/poq/nfm031

Description: Over the past 20 years, there have been dozens of news organization, academic, and nonpartisan public opinion surveys on global warming, yet there exists no authoritative summary of their collective findings. In this article, we provide a systematic review of trends in public opinion about global warming. We sifted through hundreds of polling questions culled from more than 70 surveys administered over the past 20 years. In compiling the available trends, we summarize public opinion across several key dimensions including (a) public awareness of the issue of global warming; (b) public understanding of the causes of global warming and the specifics of the policy debate; (c) public perceptions of the certainty of the science and the level of agreement among experts; (d) public concern about the impacts of global warming; (e) public support for policy action in light of potential economic costs; and (f) public support for the Kyoto climate treaty. ---- Authors

Keywords: Consequences; Humans; Human Nature

Access: Subscription Required

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The Psychology of Climate Change Communication: A Guide for Scientists, Journalists, Educators, Political Aides, and the Interested Public
http://www.cred.columbia.edu/guide/

Description: Researched and prepared by the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions, this guide provides an overview of the psychological components concerning communication about climate change.

Keywords: Consequences; Humans; Health

Access: Open Access

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Citation: Shome, Debika, and Sabine Marx. The Psychology of Climate Change Communication: A Guide for Scientists, Journalists, Educators, Political Aides, and the Interested Public. New York: Trustees of Columbia University, 2009.



Review of Economic and Livelihood Impact Assessments of, and Adaptation to, Climate Change in Melanesia
http://www.sprep.org/att/publication/000743_Review_of_economic_and_livelihood.pdf

Description: The world is expected to experience increased climate variability as well as extreme weather events, such as prolonged drought, heavy rains and heat waves, and the increased frequency and intensity of tropical cyclones. Sea level rise is also predicted.The effects of such changes will be significant to all the Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs), although the nature and degree of the socioeconomic impact of climate change cannot be predicted with any certainty at this point in time.This Melanesia project is part of a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation initiative to help understand better adaptation strategies suited to local circumstances, which are based on local information, good governance and through the strengthening of conservation practices. ---- Authors

Keywords: Consequences; Humans; Economics; Stability

Access: Open Access

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Scanning the Conservation Horizon
http://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazines/Media-Center/News-by-Topic/Wildlife/2011/01-11-19-Vulnerability-Assessment-Guide-Helps-Natural-Resource-Managers.aspx

Description: Peer-reviewed guide designed to help conservationists and resource managers craft effective strategies to prepare for and cope with the effects of climate change.

Keywords: Consequences; Humans; Human Nature; Vulnerabilities

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A Student's Guide to Global Climate Change
http://epa.gov/climatechange/kids/index.html

Description: An on-line resource for students and educators on climate change.

Keywords: Consequences; Physical Earth; Atmosphere

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Audience: Faculty, Grades 4 - 6, Grades 10 -12, Secondary

Citation:



Sustainability and the U.S. EPA
http://books.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=13152

Description: Sustainability is based on a simple and long-recognized factual premise: Everything that humans require for their survival and well-being depends, directly or indirectly, on the natural environment. The environment provides the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the food we eat.Recognizing the importance of sustainability to its work, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been working to create programs and applications in a variety of areas to better incorporate sustainability into decision making at the agency. To further strengthen the scientific basis for sustainability as it applies to human health and environmental protection, the EPA asked the National Research Council (NRC) to provide a framework for incorporating sustainability into the EPA's principles and decision-making.This framework, Sustainability and the U.S. EPA, provides recommendations for a sustainability approach that both incorporates and goes beyond an approach based on assessing and managing the risks posed by pollutants that has largely shaped environmental policy since the 1980s. Although risk-based methods have led to many successes and remain important tools, the report concludes that they are not adequate to address many of the complex problems that put current and future generations at risk, such as depletion of natural resources, climate change, and loss of biodiversity. Moreover, sophisticated tools are increasingly available to address cross-cutting, complex, and challenging issues that go beyond risk management.The report recommends that EPA formally adopt as its sustainability paradigm the widely used three pillars approach, which means considering the environmental, social, and economic impacts of an action or decision. Health should be expressly included in the social pillar. EPA should also articulate its vision for sustainability and develop a set of sustainability principles that would underlie all agency policies and programs. ---- Authors

Keywords: Consequences; Humans

Access: Subscription Required

Audience: Undergraduate Students, Lifelong Learners, Graduate Students, Faculty

Citation:



A Tale of Two Cities
http://climate.nasa.gov/news/index.cfm?NewsID=441

Description: You would never confuse Seattle, Washington, with New York City. One is home to about 600,000 people, the other has a population of 8.2 million. One ardently protects the wild salmon thrashing through its rivers, the other likes its salmon smoked and served with cream cheese on a bagel. But these cities share an important feature: They're both leaders in addressing the issue of climate change, and both rely on space-based data to help them make their plans.Even before they formally turned their attention to the climate problem, both cities were ahead of the game when it came to mitigation; that is, minimizing emissions of greenhouse gases in an attempt to slow down the advance of global warming. Seattle draws more than 90 percent of its electricity from hydroelectric sources, which emit no greenhouse gases. New York has a very low carbon footprint thanks to its high-density living and famous public-transit system. In fact, on a per capita basis, New York's greenhouse-gas emission is roughly half that of green-energy Seattle.But both cities perceived room for improvement. Seattle set a goal to slice 7 percent off its 1990 level of emissions by 2012, 30 percent by 2024, and a whopping 80 percent by 2050. New York targeted a 30 percent reduction from 2005 levels by 2030 for the whole city and by 2017 for the municipal government. Both cities report being on target to meet their goals. ---- Authors

Keywords: Consequences; Humans; Human Nature; Resilience

Access: Open Access

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The Tragedy of the Risk-Perception Commons: Culture Conflict, Rationality Conflict, and Climate Change
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1871503

Description: The conventional explanation for controversy over climate change emphasizes impediments to public understanding: Limited popular knowledge of science, the inability of ordinary citizens to assess technical information, and the resulting widespread use of unreliable cognitive heuristics to assess risk. A large survey of U.S. adults (N = 1540) found little support for this account. On the whole, the most scientifically literate and numerate subjects were slightly less likely, not more, to see climate change as a serious threat than the least scientifically literate and numerate ones. More importantly, greater scientific literacy and numeracy were associated with greater cultural polarization: Respondents predisposed by their values to dismiss climate change evidence became more dismissive, and those predisposed by their values to credit such evidence more concerned, as science literacy and numeracy increased. We suggest that this evidence reflects a conflict between two levels of rationality: The individual level, which is characterized by citizens’ effective use of their knowledge and reasoning capacities to form risk perceptions that express their cultural commitments; and the collective level, which is characterized by citizens’ failure to converge on the best available scientific evidence on how to promote their common welfare. Dispelling this, 'tragedy of the risk-perception commons,' we argue, should be understood as the central aim of the science of science communication. ---- Authors

Keywords: Consequences; Humans; Society

Access: Subscription Required

Audience: Faculty, Graduate Students, Lifelong Learners, Undergraduate Students

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Water Atlas
http://www.wateratlas.usf.edu/

Description: Wateratlas.org is the gateway to a group of websites developed by the Florida Center for Community Design + Research at the University of South Florida in partnership with local, states and federal government agencies. Our goal is to design a comprehensive data resource, eventually covering the State of Florida that helps citizens and scientists alike make informed decisions concerning our vital water resources.

Keywords: Consequences; Physical Earth; Water

Access: Open Access

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