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Coastal Area Climate Change Education (CACCE): Solutions

The CACCE Partnership is one of fifteen projects funded in 2010 by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of their Climate Change Education Partnership (CCEP) program.

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Resources | Solutions

Following the classification schema employed by the CAMEL Project website, this list includes information that could inform solutions to climate change.

 

Adaptive Response Planning to Sea Level Rise in Florida and Implications for Comprehensive and Public-Facilities Planning

Description: Introduction / Our Sample / What Do We Know About Projected Sea Level Rise for Florida? / Potential Impacts of Rising Sea Level / Adaptive Response Options / Planning Responses to Sea Level Rise / Preliminary Recommendations / References Cited / Appendix A: SRES Scenarios Employed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change / Tables / Figures.

Keywords: Solutions; Adaptation; Cross-Cutting Efforts; Planning

Access: Open Access

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Coastal Climate Adaptation

Description: Coastal communities have already been impacted by the changing climate. Adjusting to current conditions and continuing to plan for future impacts will enable these communities, both natural and human, to be healthier and more resilient. Adapting to climate change just makes sense! The Coastal Climate Adaptation Website is meant to be a community of practice. Contribute to the website by uploading your resources to the Resource page. Share your thoughts on posts in the Blog. Post upcoming climate-related events in the Calendar.

Keywords: Solutions; Adaptation; Current Practices; Coastal Environs

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Audience: Practitioners, Audience: Lifelong Learners

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Counterpart International

Description: For nearly 50 years, Counterpart International - a global development organization - has been forging partnerships with communities in need to address complex problems related to economic development, food security and nutrition, and building effective governance and institutions.

Keywords: Solutions; Adaptation; Current Practices; Natural Resources

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Audience: Lifelong Learners, Audience: Practitioners

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A Global Review of Insurance Industry Responses to Climate Change

Description: A vanguard of insurers is adapting its business model to the realities of climate change. In many ways, insurers are still catching up both to mainstream science and to their customers, which, in response to climate change and energy volatility, are increasingly changing the way they construct buildings, transport people and goods, design products and produce energy. Customers, as well as regulators and shareholders, are eager to see insurers provide more products and services that respond to the 'greening' of the global economy, expand their efforts to improve disaster resilience and otherwise be proactive about the climate change threat. Insurers are increasingly recognising the issue as one of 'enterprise risk management' (ERM), one cutting across the domains of underwriting, asset management and corporate governance. Their responses are becoming correspondingly sophisticated. Based on a review of more than 300 source documents, plus a direct survey of insurance companies, we have identified 643 specific activities from 244 insurance entities from 29 countries, representing a 50 per cent year-over-year increase in activity. These entities collectively represent $1.2 trillion in annual premiums and $13 trillion in assets, while employing 2.2 million people. In addition to activities on the part of 189 insurers, eight reinsurers, 20 intermediaries and 27 insurance organisations, we identified 34 non-insurance entities that have collaborated in these efforts. Challenges and opportunities include bringing promising products and services to scale, continuing to identify and fill market and coverage gaps and identifying and confirming the veracity of green improvements. There is also need for convergence between sustainability and disaster resilience, greater engagement by insurers in adaptation to unavoidable climate changes and to clarify the role that regulators will play in moving the market. It has not yet been demonstrated how some insurance lines might respond to climate change and a number of market segments have not yet been served with a single green insurance product or service. As insurer activities obtain more prominence, they also will be subject to more scrutiny and expectations that they are not simply greenwashing. -- Authors

Keywords: Solutions; Adaptation; Current Practices

Access: Open Access

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Citation: The Geneva Papers 34.3 (2009): 323-359



Higher Educationís Role in Adapting to a Changing Climate

Description: This report, prepared by the Higher Education Climate Adaptation Committee ó a group of experts and institutional leaders convened and coordinated by Second Nature in support of the American College & University Presidentsí Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) ó finds that higher education has taken a leadership role in climate mitigation ó that is, preventing climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions.  It now must take the lead in climate adaptation ó that is, preparing for and responding to impacts of climate change.

Keywords: Solutions; Adaptation

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Audience: Faculty, Audience: Graduate Students, Audience: Lifelong Learners

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Limiting Liability in the Greenhouse

Description: Emitters of greenhouse gases externalize the true costs of their contribution to climate change. Efforts to recover these costs, which manifest both through the costs of impacts and the costs of efforts to prevent impacts, can take the form of insurance claims as well as legal remedies. The most widely discussed insurance-related consequences of climate change are the impacts of property damage from extreme weather events. However, there is increasing awareness of the relatively subtle but equally important dimension of liability. Liability insurance risks - risks to insurers from claims of third-parties who allege injury or property damage that may be the fault of the insured - are rising as scientific uncertainty surrounding climate change declines. This Article explores three major dimensions of the issue: (1) sources of climate-change-related legal liability to third parties and their nexus with insurance and law, (2) new liabilities associated with potential technological responses to climate-change, and (3) potential roles for insurers, reinsurers, and other industry actors in proactively managing climate change-related liability insurance risks for themselves and their customers. Because the insurance sector is the world's largest industry, the response of insurers to the broader climate-change challenge will no doubt be key to the ultimate success of society's overall response.; Authors

Keywords: Solutions; Adaptation

Access: Open Access

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Citation: Stanford Environmental Law Journal 26A (2007): 251-334



Responding to Climate Change — The Insurance Industry Perspective

Description: There is growing acknowledgement among insurers that the impact of climate change on future insured losses is likely to be profound. The chairman of Lloyd’s of London has said that climate change is the numberone issue for that massive insurance group. And Europe’s largest insurer, Allianz, stated that climate change stands to increase insured losses from extreme events in an average year by 37 per cent within just a decade. Losses in a bad year could top US$1 trillion. Insurers increasingly recognise that it is the lack of action to combat climate change that is the true threat to their industry and the broader economy; engaging with the problem and mounting solutions represents not only a duty to shareholders but also a boon for economic growth.The insurance sector thus finds itself on the front lines of climate change. The response of many, particularly in the United States, has been to focus on financial means for limiting their exposure to high-risk areas along the coastlines and areas prone to wildfires. Allstate, for instance, has said that climate change has prompted it to cancel or not renew policies in many Gulf Coast states, with recent hurricanes wiping out all of the profits it had garnered in 75 years of selling homeowners insurance. The company has cut the number of homeowners’ policies in Florida from 1.2 million to 400,000 with an ultimate target of no more than 100,000. The company has curtailed activity in nearly a dozen other states. More difficult to detect than formal withdrawals or price spikes is the ‘hollowing out’ of coverage through increased deductibles, reduced limits, and new exclusions. A similar crisis in availability is occurring in many commercial insurance markets such as hotels and the energy sector, despite the absence of price regulation for non-household insurance.; Authors

Keywords: Solutions; Adaptation; Current Practices

Access: Open Access

Audience: Grades 1 - 3, Grades 10 -12, Grades 4 - 6, Secondary

Citation: Climate Action (2007): 100-103



The Ultimate Stakes: limate Change and the Fate of Civilization

Description: Second Nature Briefing Paper Series #3: The Ultimate Stakes: Climate Change and the Fate of Civilization

Keywords: Solutions; Adaptation; Future Strategies

Access: Open Access

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United Nations Environment Programme Division of Technology, Industry, and Economics

Description: We hope that this publication will support efforts to mainstream climate change considerations into tourism planning and management. We further believe that the tourism sector, through its major contribution to global development, can influence other sectors by sending important signals to governments, industries and the public that climate mitigation and adaptation measures are not only vital for our future, but also make economic sense today.

Keywords: Solutions; Adaptation; Future Strategies

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Audience: Lifelong Learners

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World Resources Report 2010-2011: Decision Making in a Changing Climate

Description: Based on input from more than 100 experts in 36 countries, this report offers specific, practical strategies and innovative case studies to inform how to integrate climate change risks into national policies and planning.; Authors

Keywords: Solutions; Adaptation

Access: Open Access

Audience: Undergraduate Students, Lifelong Learners, Graduate Students, Grades 10 -12, Faculty

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