Using Previously Published Materials in Your ETD

What should you include in your permissions appendix?

All permissions statements should be saved in an appendix in your thesis/dissertation.  These can include:

  • Email responses from a licensing/permissions contact at a publisher or organization
  • RightsLink permission statements (linked as order 'details' in your order confirmation during the RightsLink process)
  • Author Rights statements
  • Creative Commons statements and licenses
  • Fair Use worksheets (if you have determined that your use of the content is likely a fair use)

How should you indicate your use of copyrighted content in your text?

Each use of copyrighted content within your Thesis/Dissertation or manuscript should be clearly indicated to your readers.   If you are using a previously published article as a chapter in your Thesis/Dissertation, you should include a note to the reader on the first page of the chapter.  The Office of Graduate Studies has an example of this:

Figure Notes and Notes to the Reader

If, in your paper, you are including a figure, image, poem or other complete material for which the copyrights belong to someone else, you should include a figure note or a note to the reader in addition to obtaining permission for the use.  A figure note should include the citation of the original publication as well as copyright notice and permissions information.  
 

Figure Notes

Figure notes usually appear directly under a figure.  For example (APA style):
 
Journal article:
Figure #.  Your figure title.  From “Title of the article,” by W. Jones and R. Smith, 2007, Journal Title, 21, p. 122.  Copyright 2007 by Copyright Holder. Reprinted with permission.
Book:
Figure #.  Your figure title.  From Title of Book (p. 103), by A.N. Author and C.O. Author, 1994, Place of Publication: Publisher. Copyright 1994 by the Name of Copyright Holder.  Reprinted with permission.
If using a figure that was released with a creative commons license, the notes would include this information instead of the statement on copyright.  For example:
 
Journal article:
Figure #.  Your figure title.  From “Title of the article,” by W. Jones and R. Smith, 2007, Journal Title, 21, p. 122. CC-BY-NC. Used with permission.

Figure note guidance from various citation styles regarding how to indicate images created with generative AI tools is still evolving.  If using a generative AI tool to create images, it is best to be clear to your reader about the source of those images.  For example:

AI generated images:

Figure #.  Your figure title.  Image AI generated by author using [tool].

Notes to Reader

If you are using one or more articles or papers that were previously published as portions of a new work, then you should precede them with a note to the reader that includes the full published citation, copyright status, and that the article is reprinted with permissions.  For example (APA style):

This chapter was previously published as  “Title of the article,” by W. Jones and R. Smith, 2007, Journal Title, 21, p. 122.  Copyright 2007 by Copyright Holder. Reprinted with permission.

Helpful Resources